Pseudorandom

Does This Compliment Sandwich Taste Funny to You?

Eight words. “Hey, can I see you in my office?” Whatever important tasks hung spinning in the air around you darken to match your widening pupils, then plummet to the floor in a slow-motion Broadway disaster. Eight words and the serene, ever-smiling avatar of your boss.

Legacy Software: Raze and Pave or Stand Fast and Refactor

Prologue: Merek vs the Old Library The last tattered shred of hope clung limply to its flagpole and flew at half mast. “Where did we go wrong?", Merek grimaced. Hopes in Köd Kingdom had flown so high, higher than the green and black banners billowing proudly atop the castle spires. The day they’d broken ground— the popping corks and howling cheers still echoed mirthfully down his ear canals. Only the wind howled now.

Stuff Nobody Tells You About Teaching Online

I won’t kid you; the road to course creation is riddled with potholes, roadblocks, and sketchy checkpoints. It was hard. But the solution to each obstacle taught me new skills and valuable life lessons. I think it’s time to document those lessons.

An old code-poke dishes on wrist care

Night is falling as the old cowboy coder pauses his story to stoke the flickering campfire. You lean in slightly, eager to hear more. A deliberate man, he takes a draw from his tin mug and then exhales contentedly, gazing into the fire. Deliberate? — Maybe he just values a good dramatic pause, you decide. “Trouble was,” he continues, “click-clacking the day away was hard on the old wrists. Before long, I found myself square on the littered trail to neuropathy. A wise old country doc told me I had…” He pauses briefly, then pronounces each word like a hiker carefully negotiating rocky terrain, “carpal tunnel syndrome.” You can’t help but gasp.

Run for better code

You’re a programmer, software craftsman, full-stack developer, software engineer. But regardless of the titles dangling from your Twitter bio, if you want to greatly improve the quality of your code and indeed the quality of your life, there’s one more title you should consider tacking on there: “Runner"…

The QUPER model: Finding "good enough"

How I learned to get a grip by embracing "opposable opinions"

The software engineer bristles with annoyance, then cringes in fear. The cause? They came face to face with an opposable opinion. What are these opposable opinions and is it possible to refactor our brain to respond better the next time we’re confronted with one of them? Read on, fair coder! Let’s start with this illustration: Have you ever seen a basketball player “palm” a basketball? It’s a coveted feat which greatly enhances a player’s control of the ball.

Hotel Vim 🎝

** Hotel Vim ** or: Hotel Colon q. Bang on a dark linux bash prompt, new boss in my hair hot coffee and hardware, stale conditioned air ls listing the files, i cat configs that ain't right my head so heavy and my sight so dim i'd have to work through the night there she sat in the bin dir i heard the terminal bell and i was thinking to myself 'just a quick tweak and all will be well' then she lit up the keyboard and showed me the way three letters in the dark of night i thought i heard vim say welcome to the hotel :q!

Legitimize Your Project With Some Badge Swag

Badges? Why don’t I have any stinking badges? With a flick or your wrist and a flourish of your cape, you unveil your latest open source beauty. It has more bells than a bell foundry, more whistles than a traffic cop convention. But there’s one problem: your OSS-contributing peers all have these cool badges decorating their projects. They’re so shiny and colorful! They imbue an air of legitimacy to their projects, like a detective flashing his badge at a crime scene.

How to find stuff in Git

When you first started with git, you quickly got up to speed with committing, pushing, pulling, merging, and the like. But then you noticed a gaping hole in your knowledge - how do you find stuff in Git? Can you revert to a version of a file as it stood three weeks ago, or find out when a bug was introduced? Who was the last person to edit this file? They always tell you that the great thing about Git is that you [almost] never lose any history. So how do you access and utilize that history?