Pseudorandom

Run for better code

You’re a programmer, software craftsman, full-stack developer, software engineer. But regardless of the titles dangling from your Twitter bio, if you want to greatly improve the quality of your code and indeed the quality of your life, there’s one more title you should consider tacking on there: “Runner"…

The QUPER model: Finding "good enough"

Spanish for the Inner Gringo: New learning channel!

I recently launched a new learning channel, Spanish for the Inner Gringo ! It aims to help you polish up (squeak) your Spanish accent and grammar so that you sound more like a native, and less like a Hawaiian-shirt-wearing, camera-laden tourist. The videos are short (only two-minutes!) and I will be releasing one video every few weeks. The AV is sub-par, so you’re bound to get some laughs too. Subscribe to the channel and sign up for updates so you won’t miss a single video.

How I learned to get a grip by embracing "opposable opinions"

The software engineer bristles with annoyance, then cringes in fear. The cause? They came face to face with an opposable opinion. What are these opposable opinions and is it possible to refactor our brain to respond better the next time we’re confronted with one of them? Read on, fair coder! Let’s start with this illustration: Have you ever seen a basketball player “palm” a basketball? It’s a coveted feat which greatly enhances a player’s control of the ball.

Hotel Vim 🎝

** Hotel Vim ** or: Hotel Colon q. Bang on a dark linux bash prompt, new boss in my hair hot coffee and hardware, stale conditioned air ls listing the files, i cat configs that ain't right my head so heavy and my sight so dim i'd have to work through the night there she sat in the bin dir i heard the terminal bell and i was thinking to myself 'just a quick tweak and all will be well' then she lit up the keyboard and showed me the way three letters in the dark of night i thought i heard vim say welcome to the hotel :q!

Legitimize Your Project With Some Badge Swag

Badges? Why don’t I have any stinking badges? With a flick or your wrist and a flourish of your cape, you unveil your latest open source beauty. It has more bells than a bell foundry, more whistles than a traffic cop convention. But there’s one problem: your OSS-contributing peers all have these cool badges decorating their projects. They’re so shiny and colorful! They imbue an air of legitimacy to their projects, like a detective flashing his badge at a crime scene.

How to find stuff in Git

When you first started with git, you quickly got up to speed with committing, pushing, pulling, merging, and the like. But then you noticed a gaping hole in your knowledge - how do you find stuff in Git? Can you revert to a version of a file as it stood three weeks ago, or find out when a bug was introduced? Who was the last person to edit this file? They always tell you that the great thing about Git is that you [almost] never lose any history. So how do you access and utilize that history?

Brute-force all the things?

These days it’s hard to tell whether the computer saves us more time than it wastes. However recently I had an experience programming in Ruby that demonstrated to me that the computer can be our modern time-saving friend, especially when wielding a language like Ruby, delicately designed to just “get out of your way” and let you program. The story involves number crunching, eyebrow scrunching, and in the end, an unabashed brute-force beauty.

Breaking Build Postmortem: Biting the line that feeds you

It was early one weekend morning and I was trying to integrate AppVeyor with my GitHub project. But there was one problem: my build was failing miserably on AppVeyor. Strangely, it built just fine on my machine; but on AppVeyor the test ToStringShouldReturnResourceKey was failing a string comparison. Breaking Build: Analysis of a build failure Investigating the failure Fortunately I was using Shouldly, which produces very readable test output when your tests fail. See what you notice in the snippet below.

Use IFTTT more securely with proxy accounts

IFTTT automates many aspects of your online life. Is it going to rain tomorrow? Hey look I just got an email forecasting rain in my area. Golly thanks T-Guys! :) Or what about receiving an email or finding a new article in Pocket whenever there’s a new xkcd or CommitStrip . Or what if you want to automatically archive your tweets or internet favorites to Evernote or OneNote? Your online alliterative conditional buddy can do all that, and more.